What Should I Keep in My Child’s Portfolio?

We have reached the last day of the homeschool planning mini-series! Thanks so much for joining me over this past week. I hope each post has been immensely helpful for getting your ducks in a row for next school year. Today we discuss what to keep in your child’s homeschool portfolio to ensure that you’re abiding by your state’s homeschool laws and keeping a good sampling of their work for that year. Here are the topics for the other days in the series: Day 1: Planning Your Homeschool Year Day 2: Homeschool Schedules and Routines Day 3: The Relaxed Homeschooler’s

Non-Book Learning for Your Homeschool

Welcome to Day 4 of my homeschool planning mini-series. We’ll be discussing myriad ways of learning that do not require a curriculum or even a book! This is my absolute favorite aspect of homeschooling. My kids have the freedom to learn in so many ways that could never happen in a traditional school setting. Here are the topics for the other days in the series: Day 1: Planning Your Homeschool Year Day 2: Homeschool Schedules and Routines Day 3: The Relaxed Homeschooler’s Guide to Picking Curriculum Day 4: Non-Book Learning for Your Homeschool Day 5: What Should I Put in

The Relaxed Homeschooler’s Guide to Picking Curriculum

Welcome to Day 3 of the homeschool planning mini-series! Today’s work is probably the most difficult but most important to your success. Choosing a curriculum can be daunting since we have soooo many choices! I’m going to cover a few ways to narrow down the playing field and some strategies to evaluate what you’re left with. For this series, I’m referring to “curriculum” in the broad sense of everything you might use for learning purposes in your homeschool. But for this article, I want to focus on books and texts and sets you might be interested in using. Tomorrow we

Homeschool Schedules and Routines

Are you a mom who needs a set schedule to keep you on track? Or will a general routine suffice? Or maybe you’re a fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants type. I’m solidly in the middle and that’s the angle I’m coming from for today’s article in the homeschool planning mini-series. But there’s so much more to it than just schedule or no schedule! Today is Day 2 of my planning series. Here are the topics for the other days: Day 1: Planning Your Homeschool Year Day 2: Homeschool Schedules and Routines Day 3: The Relaxed Homeschooler’s Guide to Picking Curriculum Day 4: Non-Book Learning

Planning Your Homeschool Year

I’m excited to kick off Day 1 of my homeschool planning mini-series! We will be covering everything you need to know for planning your homeschool year so you can relax over summer and start the year with confidence. Here are the topics for each day of the series: Day 1: Planning Your Homeschool Year Day 2: Homeschool Schedules and Routines Day 3: The Relaxed Homeschooler’s Guide to Picking Curriculum Day 4: Non-Book Learning for Your Homeschool Day 5: What Should I Put in My Child’s Portfolio? This is also part of a blog hop with the Homeschool Review Crew! Please

What are notebooking pages?

When I first heard the term, I was like…soooo, these are blank lined pages like in a notebook? What is so special about that? And why would someone pay for these?? As it turns out, it’s something pretty cool. These ARE blank pages for your student to fill out. And they may have lines on them. But they are more than that! They might: be tailored to a certain activity, subject, or topic have decorations, pictures, or words provide space to write and also to draw (great for younger kids) Notebooking pages serve as a way to reinforce information your

Unit Study Planning

I’ll be the first to admit that I can get super overwhelmed when planning our homeschool year. Am I cramming in too much? At the right pace? A balance of challenge and ease? What materials will help them learn best? Are textbooks really necessary?? One thing I don’t struggle with is planning a unit study! I love the topical approach to subjects that are non-linear, like science and social studies at the elementary level. Unit studies are the perfect solution for us. I’m going to share with you the system I’ve developed that helps me get my ducks in a